Advertisement

Patient-reported benefits and limitations of mobile health technologies for diabetes in pregnancy: A scoping review

  • Katelyn Sushko
    Correspondence
    Corresponding Author: Katelyn Sushko, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Nursing, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, Canada, L8S [email protected]
    Affiliations
    School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Health Sciences Centre, 2J20, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton Ontario, L8S 4K1, Canada
    Search for articles by this author
  • Holly Tschirhart Menezes
    Affiliations
    School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Health Sciences Centre, 2J20, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton Ontario, L8S 4K1, Canada
    Search for articles by this author
  • Qi Rui Wang
    Affiliations
    School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Health Sciences Centre, 2J20, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton Ontario, L8S 4K1, Canada
    Search for articles by this author
  • Kara Nerenberg
    Affiliations
    Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1, Canada
    Search for articles by this author
  • Donna Fitzpatrick-Lewis
    Affiliations
    Population Health Research Institute, Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, 237 Barton Street East, Hamilton, Ontario, L8L 2X2, Canada
    Search for articles by this author
  • Diana Sherifali
    Affiliations
    School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Health Sciences Centre, 2J20, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton Ontario, L8S 4K1, Canada

    Population Health Research Institute, Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, 237 Barton Street East, Hamilton, Ontario, L8L 2X2, Canada

    Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1, Canada

    Diabetes Care and Research Program, The Boris Clinic, McMaster University Medical Centre, Hamilton Health Sciences, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    Search for articles by this author
Published:August 11, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcjd.2022.08.001
      This paper is only available as a PDF. To read, Please Download here.

      Abstract

      Background

      For women with pre-existing and gestational diabetes, pregnancy involves specialized and intensive medical care to optimize maternal and infant outcomes. Medical management for patients with diabetes in pregnancy typically occurs via frequent face-to-face outpatient appointments. COVID-19-induced barriers to face-to-face care have identified the need for high-quality, patient-centred virtual healthcare modalities, such as mobile health (mHealth) technologies.

      Objective

      The study objective was to identify the patient-reported benefits and limitations of mHealth technologies among women with diabetes in pregnancy. We also aimed to determine how the women’s experiences aligned with the best practice standards for patient-centred communication.

      Methods

      The framework by Arksey and O’Malley for conducting scoping reviews with refinements by Levac et al. were used to guide this review. Relevant studies were identified through comprehensive database searches of MEDLINE, Embase, Emcare, and PsychINFO. Thomas and Harden's Methods for the Thematic Synthesis of Qualitative Research in Systematic Reviews guided the synthesis of patient-reported benefits and limitations of mHealth technology.

      Results

      Overall, 19 studies describing the use of 16 unique mobile health technologies among 742 women were included in the final review. Patient-reported benefits of mobile health included: convenience, support of psychosocial well-being and facilitation of diabetes self-management. Patient-reported limitations included: lack of important technological features, perceived burdensome aspects of mHealth and lack of trust in virtual healthcare.

      Conclusions

      Women with diabetes report some benefits from mHealth use during pregnancy. Co-designing future technologies with end-users may help address the perceived limitations and effectiveness of mHealth technologies.

      Keywords

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Canadian Journal of Diabetes
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect